Alfa Romeo Giulia

Alfa Romeo Giulia
Alfa Romeo Giulia

Alfa Romeo Giulia was the name of three separate models manufactured by the Italian car manufacturer Alfa Romeo.

The first-ever Alfa Romeo Giulia was produced from 1962 to 1978. This was a Type 105 four-door executive compact car with sport handling and high performance.

The second Alfa Romeo Giulia was an updated high performance, higher trim Alfa Romeo Giulietta variant of Alfa Romeo Spider, Sprint, and Sprint Special.

Alfa Romeo Giulia & Spider
Alfa Romeo Giulia & Spider

The third Alfa Romeo Giulia is the compact executive sports sedan (type 952) which was unveiled for the 2015 model year.

1962 – 1978 Alfa Romeo Giulia (Type 105)

1962 - 1978 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1
1962 – 1978 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1

Alfa Romeo was among the first automotive manufacturers to equip a powerful engine in a mass-produced lightweight 1-tonne four-door car.

The Type 105 Alfa Romeo Giulia was equipped with a four-cylinder engine attached to a lightweight alloy twin head overhead camshaft. It was similar to that of the earlier Giulietta (750/101) range.

The engine options were either one out of a 1.3-liter twin-cam inline-four or a 1.6-liter twin-cam inline-four engine. 

A 1.8-liter Perkins inline-four diesel engine was also made available.

All these engines were then mated to a five-speed manual transmission.

1962 - 1978 Alfa Romeo Giulia 2
1962 – 1978 Alfa Romeo Giulia 2

There were many carburetion variants, different compression ratios, and fuel injection systems. The maximum power output often ranged from a minimum of 80 horsepower to 110 horsepower.

The Giulia sedans were well praised by the media and enthusiasts for sporty handling and impressive acceleration due to the excellent power to weight ratio as the car only weighed 1000kg.

The considerable power output despite the smaller displacement of the engines and the lower curb weight of the car made it one of the fastest accelerating mass production cars of its time.  Soon, it was considered as one of the best compact performance sedans in the market.

The various carburetion setups and engine variants made it more attractive to many as they could personalize the performance according to their needs.

The Super trim offered a twin carbureted 1.6-liter inline-four engine. This variant had a top speed of 106mph. The 0-60 acceleration took only 12 seconds. Though these specifications sound outdated by today’s standard, it was better than most sports cars of the 1960s and 1970s ever achieved.

1962 - 1978 Alfa Romeo Giulia
1962 – 1978 Alfa Romeo Giulia

The styling cues were boxy, the roofline, hood, boot, and front fascia were all boxy. The aerodynamic drag coefficient was rated at 0.34 cd.

 All the Giulia cars were fitted with Pirelli Cinturato 165HR14 or 155HR15 tires.

 1962 – 1967 Giulia Turismo Internazionale   

1962 Alfa Romeo Giulia TI
1962 Alfa Romeo Giulia TI

Giulia TI was unveiled at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza in 1962. Alfa Romeo Giulia TI was the first variant of the Giulia model line to be unveiled.

This car featured a 1.5-liter Alfa Romeo Twin Cam engine with a single Solex 33 PAIA twin-choke downdraft carburetor. This powertrain delivered 91 horsepower at 6200rpm when mated to a five-speed manual transmission. It also featured a column-mounted shifter as standard.

The car was marketed as a six-seater car. The standard column-mounted shifter enabled the Alfa Romeo to include a front bench seat. Along with rear seating for three people, this setup now provided seating accommodation for six people. Despite this, the car was a comfortable four-seater due to the limited interior space.

Early models and their unique features.

The interior of the earlier models was finished in cloth and vinyl upholstery, gray trapezoid instrument panel including a strip speedometer, along with a black steering wheel with two ivory-colored spokes and a chrome half horn ring. 

This car also featured drum brakes on all wheels. The front brakes were triple shoe type brakes similar to the Giuliettas. Approximate 22,000 to 23,000 cars were made with this configuration

From August 1963, four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes and a brake servo were included as standard. 

1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti
1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti

From May 1964 onwards a floor shifter was made available as an option that could be ordered in conjunction with separate front seats.

The right-hand-drive model also entered production in 1964 due to the high demand from the UK and Swedish markets. The right-hand-drive variants featured a floor shifter as standard.

In February 1966, the floor shifter was made standard, the interior seats were replaced with much modern and comfortable ones, an all-new dashboard with triple round instruments instead of the strip speedometer, and new door cards were added.

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 TI
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 TI

The new dashboard featured three instrument gauges, a speedometer, a rev counter, and a smaller fuel gauge in the center.

The new Giulia TI cars featured L shape chrome stripes around the tail lights instead of the C-shaped ones.

The production of the Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti ended in 1967 and was replaced with the Giulia 1600S, which became the new entry-level 1.6-liter inline-four equipped model.

Polizia di Stato used many Giulia TI cars as their primary interceptors on high-speed chases due to their admirable performance. The early police cars were fitted with a mesh instead of the inner headlights to make the siren mounted behind sound louder.  

1963 – 1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super.   

Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super
Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super

The Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super was a road-legal high-performance variant of the Giulia TI. It was specifically developed for circuit racing and was unveiled to the press at the Monza race track on 24 April 1964. By the beginning of May, it received the international FIA and local CSAI homologation for racing and was then extensively used in the European Touring car challenge.

It was produced in limited numbers and came with many performance-oriented mechanical components and weight reduction.

To save weight, the heater, door armrests, glove box lid, ashtrays, and the grab handle in front of the passenger were deleted. 

The Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super was fitted with a 1.5-liter inline-four engine just as the one installed on the Giulia Sprint Speciale coupe. It was fitted with two twin-choke horizontal Weber 45 DCOE 14 carburetors. This powertrain was then mated to a five-speed manual transmission unit. It delivered 110 horsepower at 6500rpm, similar to the power output of Giulia Sprint Speciale.

The total curb weight of the car was only 910kg when compared to the 1000kg weight of the Giulia TI. The weight savings was largely due to the bumpers without over riders, fixed front quarter windows, mesh grilles replacing the inner pair of headlamps, plexiglass rear windows, magnesium lightweight alloy wheels with hubcaps, etc.

Disc brakes were standard on all four wheels.

The cars that were built after August of 1964, used the bodyshell of the Giulia TI with mounting points for the brake servo but were never fitted with a one.

The gear shifter and the handbrake lever were floor-mounted as standard.

The standard instrument cluster was a three-instrument cluster unit featuring a speedometer, tachometer, and a multi-gauge instrument featuring fuel level, water temperature, oil temperature, and oil pressure).

The steering wheel was a three-spoke aluminum unit with a horn in the center. This unit was lightweight than the normal steering wheel on a Giulia TI.

Front racing type bucket seats and safety belts were standard.

To make it stand out from the Giulia TI, the Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super came with green quadrifoglios on the front panels and tail panels. Giulia TI Super lettering badges were installed on the hood and the rear.

All the cars were painted in white as standard, but two examples were painted in red and grey due to special order.

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia TI
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia TI

Polizia di Stato owned two Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Supercars and they were used at the police academy to train new recruits.

1964 – 1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300

Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300
Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300

The Giulia 1300 was the entry-level 1.3-liter model of the Giulia family. It came equipped with a 1.3-liter inline-four engine and a five-speed manual gearbox. The trim and features were simplified to keep the cost down.

It was unveiled on the 11th of May 1964 at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza.

This car was manufactured in left-hand variation only. It was sold alongside the slightly cheaper Giulia TI which was nearing its production.

The Giulia 1300 used a twin-cam engine derived from the Giulia TI but with lower displacement. It was equipped with a single Solex 32 PAIA seven downdraft twin-choke carburetor.

A four-speed manual gearbox with a floor-mounted shifter was installed as standard. Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 is the only Giulia not to be fitted with a five-speed manual gearbox. 

This resulted in a maximum power output of 77 horsepower at 6000rpm.

The top speed of the car was 96mph.

Disc brakes without servo were standard at first, but brake servo also became standard with time.

Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300
Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300

The Giulia 1300 features a unique grille design housing single instead of twin head-lamps, all-metal hubcaps, rectangular side repeaters without any ornamentation. It didn’t feature most of the exterior chrome trim including the trim around tail lights. Bumper over-riders were also deleted to keep the cost down.

The dashboard and the steering wheel derived from the Giulia TI.

Rubber mats were put instead of carpets, passenger grab handle, and rear ashtrays were also removed.

In the September of 1967, The Giulia 1300 received a styling upgrade and now featured a black mesh grille with three horizontal chrome bars, vertical louvers at the base of the windshield, a three-round instrument cluster dashboard, and the three-spoke steering wheel from the Giulia TI.

1965 – 1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Super was unveiled at the 1965 Geneva Motor Show.

Giulia Super was based on the technology derived from the Giulia TI Super.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super was designed for track racing, but the Giulia Super was intended for on-road performance.

It was equipped with a 1.5-liter engine with two double-choke Weber 40 DCOE carburetors for smooth but torquier delivery.  

An all-new dashboard now had two large round instruments featuring the speedometer and tachometer. A clock was also added,

A sportier three aluminum spike and center horn steering wheel was used at first, but it was replaced with a one with horn pushes in the spokes.

Disc brakes with the servo on all four corners became standard from the very beginning.

ALFA ROMEO Giulia Super
ALFA ROMEO Giulia Super
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super Advertisement
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super Advertisement
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super Advertisement
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super Advertisement

A serpent badge was added to the C pillar.  This was a distinguishing feature of the Super saloon.

For the 1968 model year, the suspension was reworked. Now it had a revised geometry and an anti-roll bar.

The wheels were changed in size from the 5Jx15 to 5Jx14. Pirelli Cinturato tires were included as standard.

In 1970, dual-circuit brakes, a center-mounted handbrake lever instead of the under-dash leaver, larger exterior door handles were added.

In 1972, the Giulia Super was incorporated into the Giulia 1.3 – Giulia 1.6 model range.

1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super - Carabinieri
1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia Super – Carabinieri
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super - Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super – Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super - Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super – Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super - Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super – Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super - Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super – Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super - Polizia di Stato
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super – Polizia di Stato

 1965 – 1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 TI

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 TI
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 TI

The Alfa Romeo Giulia TI was equipped with a 1.3-liter inline-four engine with a single downdraft carburetor. This engine was derived from the GT 1300 Junior Coupe with a different camshaft timing but featured the same camshafts and a fuel induction system. This engine was then mated to a five-speed manual gearbox.

This setup delivered 81 horsepower at 6000rpm.

A three-spoke Bakelite steering wheel with a plastic horn push covering the center. The dashboard featured a strip speedometer like that of the early Giulia TI cars.

For 1968, the old dashboard was replaced with a dashboard unit from the Giulia Super but featured a simpler instrument cluster, featuring a large speedometer and a tachometer, and a separate fuel gauge. The revised suspension system, wheels, and tire upgrades for the Giulia Super were also made available for the Giulia 1300 TI as standard.

1969 Alfa-Romeo Giulia 1300 TI
1969 Alfa-Romeo Giulia 1300 TI
1969 Alfa-Romeo Giulia 1300 TI
1969 Alfa-Romeo Giulia 1300 TI
1969 Alfa-Romeo Giulia 1300 TI
1969 Alfa-Romeo Giulia 1300 TI

1970 model updates included dual-circuit brakes, center handbrake, larger external door handles, and top-hinged pedals on left-hand drive cars.

1968 – 1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600S

1969 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Super
1969 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Super

The 1968 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600S was actually a reintroduced 1962 – 1967 Giulia Turismo Internazionale in terms of mechanical components and trim levels.

It featured a reworked 1.5-liter single carbureted engine delivering 94 horsepower maximum output at 5500rpm. 

1969 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Super
1969 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Super

The last 1970 model year cars also featured the top-hinged pedals for left-hand drive cars, center-mounted handbrake, and dual circuit brakes as standard.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600S was replaced with Giulia 1300 Super for the 1970 model year.

1970 – 1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super

1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super
1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super was developed to replace the Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600S.

This car featured a GT 1300 Junior derived 1.3-liter inline-four engine featuring two double choke horizontal carburetors.

The lower displacement of the engine meant lower tax rates and this tempted more buyers to purchase this car than the Giulia 1600S did previously.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Super 1300
Alfa Romeo Giulia Super 1300

Despite the lower displacement of the engine, the twin carburetion system optimized the engine to deliver similar power output.

For the 1972 model year, this car was rationalized into the Giulia Super 1.3 and Giulia Super 1.6 model range.

1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan
1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super sedan

1972 – 1974 Giulia Super 1.3 and the 1972 – 1974 Giulia Super 1.6

1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1.3 Super
1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1.3 Super

For the 1972 model year, the Giulia range was slightly updated.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Super 1300 and the Giulia Super variants were rebranded and remarketed as Giulia Super 1.3 and Giulia Super 1.6.

The interior and exterior trim, creature comforts, mechanical components were literary the same with the only difference being the slightly altered engine displacements and maximum power output of those engines.

A small Alfa Romeo badge was placed on the C pillar to give it a distinguishing look. Wheels with hubcaps and exposed wheel nuts were also included as standard.

1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Rallye

For the 1972 model year, the Alfa Romeo South African division released a new Giulia variant called the Giulia 1600 Rallye.

It was a locally developed more powerful 1.6-liter inline-four equipped variant of the Giulia 1300 Super.

It was based on the body and mechanical components of the Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 Super with the only difference being the 1.6-liter engine instead of the 1.3-liter inline-four.

It was then fitted with fully adjustable seats, racing-style rearview mirrors, rally lamps, and a limited-slip differential as standard.

This car was specially developed to withstand the hardships of the South African terrain.

The power output of the engine was rated at 125 horsepower.

This car was produced in limited numbers and the exact production numbers are not known and are rumored to be few dozens or even less.

1974 – 1977 Giulia Nuova Super

1977 Alfa Romeo Giulia Nuova Super
1977 Alfa Romeo Giulia Nuova Super

The Giulia Super range was reintroduced and remarketed as Giulia Nuova Super for the 1974 model year as a single range. Giulia Nuova Super range incorporated the Giulia 1300 Super and Giulia 1600 Super variants of the previous years.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Nuova Super featured an all-new black plastic front grille and a flat trunk lid without the characteristic center spine.

Despite these minor aesthetic changes, these cars were largely similar to the Giulia 1300 Super and Giulia 1600 Supercars of the previous years.

The engines were reworked to deliver a maximum output of 101 horsepower at 5500rpm.

Production ended in 1977 following the low demand. 

Alfa Romeo Giulia Nuova Super 1300
Alfa Romeo Giulia Nuova Super 1300

1976 – 1977 Alfa Romeo Giulia Nuova Super Diesel

This variant was unveiled in 1976 as the first-ever diesel engine-powered Alfa Romeo passenger car. This car was designed due to the demand for a diesel-powered more fuel-efficient car by the fiscal legislation of the Italian government following the economic crisis and the effects of the 1973 global oil crisis.

The engine used in the Alfa Romeo Giulia Nuova Super Diesel was a naturally aspirated Perkins’s type 4 engine with a displacement of 1.7-liters.

This engine was also used to power the Alfa Romeo F12 van.

The power output was a dismal 54 horsepower at 4000rpm. 

Despite the slower acceleration, this car was capable of achieving a maximum speed of 86mph, a respectable speed for a mass-production car.

It was the slowest yet the most fuel-efficient Giulia.

A total of 6537 units were made between 1976 and 1977.

Giulia Spider, Giulia Sprint and Giulia Sprint Speciale

Alfa Romeo Giulia sprint
Alfa Romeo Giulia sprint

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider, Giulia Spider, and Giulia Sprint Speciale were based on a shortened chassis and underpinnings from the Giulia four-door saloon.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider
Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider

These Giulia Spider and Giulia Sprint cars were the successors of Giulietta Spider and Giulietta Sprint cars of the previous years.  The production started in late 1962 as 1963 mode year units and ended in 1977.

The Giulia Sprint, Giulia GT, and Giulia GTV cars were designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro at Gruppo Bertone. It was evident that these variants were heavily influenced by his previous work with his Alfa Romeo 2000 Sprint and 2600 Sprint cars.

The balance of glass and metal, the shape of the front and rear glass panels and the shape of the cabin, and the flat grille with incorporated headlamps were unique at the time. 

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

The Giulia Sprint GTC variant was designed by Carrozzeria Touring. This car was a limited production of 1000 units. To make it a convertible, it was modified from the standard car by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan. This car was known as the Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTC. This was based on the Giulia Sprint GT. The production ran from 1964 to 1966.

The Giulia Junior Zagato was designed by Ercole Spada at Zagato. This was also a limited production run. It featured a more aerodynamic two-door coupe body style.

The Giulia Sprint GTC and Giulia Junior Zagato were offered by Alfa Romeo as catalog models.

All these variants featured a four-seat two-door layout.

The 195 Series coupes featured a Gran Turismo (GT) model description, which was common to all models in one form or another.

The variants in Giulia Sprint and Spider model range can be categorized into two main groups.  The GT and GTV. Gran Turismo (GT) and Gran Turismo Veloce (GTV)were the sportiest cars in the Alfa Romeo model range and sold well around the world. These cars were famous for their excellent handling, acceleration, and overall performance.

The first Giulia Sprint GT was the first to carry the GT inscription. It then went through evolution to become the Giulia Sprint GT Veloce in 1966, the 1750 GTV in 1967, and eventually ended up evolving to the 2000 GTV.

The engine configurations ranged from 1.5-liter to 1.7 liters of displacement.   

The GT Junior range featured engines with lower displacement. GT Juniors were sold in higher numbers due to the lower price tag when comparing with the GT variants.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint & Spider
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint & Spider

The GT Junior cars were famous among people who wanted something fast, stylish, handles well, but with moderate power at disposal.

Lower displacement engines meant lower taxation in Italy and many key European markets. Some markets had limitations regarding engine displacement, thus allowing Alfa Romeo to market Junior models instead of GT variants in those markets.

The first GT Junior variant was unveiled in 1966. It was known as the Giulia GT 1300 Junior. It was equipped with a 1.3-liter inline-four engine and various performance-oriented modifications. Another GT Junior model was introduced for the 1972 model year, and this was known as the Giulia GT 1600 Junior.

Zagato variants of the GT 1300 Junior and GT 1600 Junior were produced in limited numbers. These Zagato variants featured a more aerodynamic body design which was designed by Ercole Spade at Zagato.

Both GT and GT Junior models were also available with lightweight variants. These lightweight variants were known as the Gran Turismo Alleggerita (GTA).

The GTA models were specifically intended for competition homologation in their engine size classes.

These GTA variants featured extensive modifications to make them race-ready. Due to these modifications, GTA variants carried a significantly higher price tag and thus resulted in limited production numbers.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA

The GTA models were successful in various classes and categories as there were many engine variations allowing them to compete in many classes and categories.   These were successful and emerged victorious in many race events.

Some of the most distinguished GTA variants are the Giulia Sprint GTA, Giulia GTA 1300 Junior, and GTAm.

1962 – 1964 Giulia Spider and Giulia Sprint

1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint
1962 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint

Giulia Spider, Giulia Sprinter, and the Giulia Sprint Speciale were actually rebadged and high-power versions of the earlier series 101 Giulietta models and were unveiled alongside the Giulia sedans in 1962.

All these models featured a 1.6-liter inline-four engine instead of Giulietta’s 1.3-liter inline-four engine. The 1.6-liter inline-four delivered 91 horsepower when mated to a five-speed manual gearbox.

The Giulia Spider features a hood bulge to accommodate the slightly taller engine.

1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider

The Giulia Sprint coupe was unveiled in June 1962 and was equipped with the same 1.3-liter as a Giulietta model briefly. This version came with a small 1300 script on the lower boot lid. The later models came with a 1.6-liter inline-four engine and these featured a 1600 badge in the rear side panels just behind the wheel.    

1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider
1962 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider
Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider
Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider
1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1963 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint
1963 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint
1962 - 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1962 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spyder
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spyder
1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint
1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint

The Giulia Sprint and Giulia Spider were discontinued in 1964.

1962 – 1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale
1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale

The Sprint Speciale was available until the 1966 model year. This variant came with the same engine used to power the Giulia Sprint Speciale and Giulia TI Super. The 1.6-liter inline-four engine now delivered 110 horsepower.

In the mid-1966 model year, the Giulia Sprint Speciale was replaced with the Spider 1600 Duetto.

1963 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT

1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Sprint GT
1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Sprint GT

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT was unveiled at a press event held at the newly opened Alfa Romeo’s Arese plant in 1963. It was produced from 1963 to 1965. It was also displayed at the Frankfurt Motor Show, a few months later.

This is a two-door coupe and was designed by Bertone. This Bertone body was known as the Scalino, which means step frontwards in Italian. This name was a reference to the leading edge of the engine compartment lid which sat 1cm above the front fascia of the car.

1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT

Initially, it was marketed as a four-seater, but soon it was changed to a more relevant 2+2 description.

The Giulia GT features several design elements to set it apart from the other variants.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GT
Alfa Romeo Giulia GT
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 1
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 1
1967 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1967 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1966 Alfa-Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
1966 Alfa-Romeo Giulia Sprint GT

The exterior badges with a chrome script reading “Giulia Sprint GT” on the hood and rectangular chrome script reading “Disegno di Bertone” badges in the front side fenders towards the nose from the wheel arches.

Single-piece chrome bumpers with no overrides, flat chrome grille in plain, wide rectangular mesh without additional chrome bars were the main design elements that gave it a unique look.

The interior featured a padded vinyl dashboard which was characterized by a concave horizontal fascia, finished in gray anti-glare crackle effect paint.

The instrument cluster now featured four instruments inserted in the horizontal fascia which was located in front of the driver. The larger two were the tachometer and the speedometer. These equally sized two instruments were surrounded by two smaller ones with the left side one featuring oil pressure and fuel gauge, and the right one featuring oil temperature and water temperature gauges.

The steering wheel was a non-dished one with three aluminum spokes, a thin Bakelite rim, and a center horn button.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 2
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 2
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 5
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 5

The seats were vinyl covered with fabric centerpieces. The floor was fully carpeted as standard.

The leather upholstery was available as a premium option. 

 The Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT was also available in Bertone De Luxe body. This included extra options such as the leather seats as standards. There were five leather seat colors to choose from dark brown, red, black, gray, and beige.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint was fitted with a 1.5-liter all-aluminum two cam inline-four engine. This engine had a 78mm bore, 82mm stroke, a 6.38-liter oil sump, and a 7.41-liter radiator. This engine was debuted in 1962 with the Giulia Berlina.

The two twin-choke Weber 40 DCOE 4 carburetors equipped with the 1.5-liter engine delivered a maximum power output of 105 horsepower at 6000rpm when connected to an all-synchromesh five-speed manual gearbox.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT was equipped with a braking system with four Dunlop disc brakes and a vacuum servo.

The rear brakes featured an unusual arrangement with the slave cylinders mounted on the axle tubes, operating the brake calipers by a system of levers and cranks.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 3
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 3
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 4
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 4
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT

The total curb weight was 950kg.

The car had a top speed of 112mph (180 km/h) according to Alfa Romeo.

A total of 21,902 Giulia Sprint GT cars were produced from 1963 to 1965. Only 2274 of these were of right-hand configuration and 1354 were fully finished in Alfa Romeo’s Arese factory. 920 out of these were shipped to foreign countries to be assembled as complete knockdown kits.

This model was replaced with Giulia Sprint GT Veloce for the 1966 model year.

1964 – 1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC was a cabriolet version of the Giulia Sprint GT. It was offered from 1965 to 1966. The total production was approximately 1000 units.

It entered production in 1964 and was unveiled at the Monza Race Track on the 4th of March, 1965, and again to the public at the 1965 Geneva Motor Show.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC was based on the coupe’s body and mechanical components. It maintained the same technical specifications and performance.

The conversion process to turn the coupe into a cabriolet was done by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan.

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC Spider
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC Spider
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC

The main disguisable features are the Giulia GTC badge on the boot lid, and the dashboard with a black finish instead of the gray crackle paint.

To improve the body rigidity which was lost due to the removal of the fixed pillars and roof, Carrozzeria Touring added reinforcement to several areas of the body shell.

The 2+2 seating layout of the Alfa Romeo Sprint GT was also retained for the Giulia GTC.

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC interior
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC interior

When unveiling the Giulia GTC, Carrozzeria Touring was in serious financial trouble due to finical mismanagement and spending too much money on research and development. It went out of business soon after the production of this model ended.

Due to the removal of pillars and fixed roof, the curb weight was now 905kg.

The complete production of the Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC is as follows.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC

The total number of cars built from 1964 to 1966 was 998. 899 out of these are of left-hand drive configuration while 99 were of right-hand drive configuration.

Only left-hand drive Giulia GTC cars were made in 1964 with a total production of 106 cars in that year. In 1965, another 548 were made, followed by 247 for the 1966 model year. 54 and 45 right-hand drive cars were made in 1965 and 1966 respectively.

1966 – 1968 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT Veloce 1600

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT 1600 was replaced with Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT Veloce for the mid-1966 model year. It was unveiled at the 1966 Geneva Motor Show alongside the 1750 Spider Veloce. 

It was very similar to the Giulia Sprint GT but came with many improvements such as a reworked engine, better interior fit and finish, and different exterior trim.

Several stylistic features were given to make it stand out from other Giulia Sprint cars.

A green Quadrigoglio on an ivory background was featured on the front fender.

A chrome “Veloce” lettering on the rear side panels.

The badges now featured lettering “Giulia Sprint GT” with the addition of round enamel badges on the C pillar.

Black mesh grille with three horizontal chrome bars.

The grille heart has seven bars instead of six.

The stainless-steel bumpers were added instead of chromed mild steel bumpers on the Giulia Sprint GT. Though the bumpers were of the same shape, it was made in two pieces in the front and three pieces in the rear with small covers hiding the joining rivets.

Fake Wood finish dashboard surface instead of the anti-glare gray crackle finish.

Dished three aluminum spoke steering wheel with a black rim and a horn button through the spokes.

1967 Alfa-Romeo Giulia GT Veloce
1967 Alfa-Romeo Giulia GT Veloce
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT Veloce
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT Veloce

The front seats were revised to a mild bucket design.

The Veloce was equipped with a 1.6-liter twin-cam inline-four engine mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. This engine was identical to the engine used in the Alfa Romeo Spider 1600 Duetto. It featured a slightly larger exhaust valve of 37mm instead of 35mm.

The power delivery of the engine was rated at 108 horsepower at 6000rpm.

The curb weight of the car was just 1012kg.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Veloce
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV

This resulted in good power to weight ratio. Therefore, the top speed of the car was now more than 115mph.

Earlier Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Veloces featured the same Dunlop disc brakes with servo as the Giulia Sprint GT did.

1966 model year onwards, the Giulia Sprint GT Veloce cars came with ATE disc brakes as the Giulia GT 1300 Junior.

The ATE brakes featured a handbrake system entirely separate from the pedal brakes, using drum brakes incorporated in the rear disc castings.

The Giulia Sprint GT Veloce could be ordered in the Bertone De Luxe body option. This package included many extra options as standard such as the leather interior.

Only leather colors available for the interior of the Giulia Sprint GT Veloce were dark brown or red leather. The seat panels had perforations in the leather.

ALFA Romeo Giulia Sprint GT Veloce
ALFA Romeo Giulia Sprint GT Veloce

There were three versions of the Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Veloce 1600.

The first version was known as Group 1 and had deep rear wheel arches and Dunlop brakes front and rear.

Version two or Group 2 had deep rear wheel arches and ATE adapters on the front with Dunlop uprights to take ATE calipers. The rear axle had ATE calipers. These cars featured a limited-slip differential and different gear ratios in the gearbox and a selection of wheels widths and some other features.

Version three or Group 3 came with high wheel arches and solid ATE uprights, with no adapters. The rear axle had ATE calipers. 

Production of the Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Veloce 1600 began in 1965 for left-hand drive configuration and 1966 for right-hand drive configuration.

Six colors for the interior sears were available for the interior seats of the Giulia GT Veloce 1600

The production continued until 1968 despite the successor was introduced in 1967.

1967 – 1972 Alfa Romeo 1750 GT Veloce.

1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GTV rear
1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GTV rear

The Alfa Romeo 1750 GT Veloce was developed as a successor to the Giulia GT Veloce 1600. The Alfa Romeo 1750 GT Veloce was also known as the 1750 GTV.

It entered production in 1967 alongside the 1750 Berlina sedan 1750 Spider cars.

It was unveiled to the public in 1968.

There were many updates and modifications.

Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GTV engine
Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GTV engine

The biggest modification was the increased engine displacement of the inline-four engine, now featuring 1.8-liters instead of the previous 1.6-liter. The engine bore was now 80mm, 88.5 mm stoke, 6.6-liter oil capacity, 9.58-liter radiator capacity.

The maximum power output was a respectable 120 horsepower at 5500rpm.  Maximum torque was rated at 137 lb-ft of torque at 3000rpm.

The stroke length of 88.5mm compared to previous engines 82mm resulted in a reduced rpm redline of 6000rpm from` previous 7000rpm.

A higher ratio final drive of 10/41 instead of 9/41 was used though the gearbox ratios were still the same.

These changes resulted in slightly improved performance in comparison with Giulia Sprint GT Veloce. On the road, it was more flexible to achieve and to maintain higher average speeds. This was then helpful for fast touring.

The curb weight of the car was 1038kg.

To comply with US emission regulations, the 1.8-liter inline-four engine was fitted with a fuel injection system made by SPICA, a subsidiary of Alfa Romeo.

The Canadian market cars featured the same SPICA fuel injection setup after 1971 due to the retaining of carburetors for other markets.

The chassis was also significantly updated. The wheel sizes were changed from 165/14 Pirelli Cinturato or Michelin XAS from the previous 155/5 Pirelli Cinturato and wheel size to 5.5Jx14 instead of the previous 5Jx15. This gave the wheels a wider profile yet slightly smaller rolling diameter.

The suspension system was reworked and now features an anti-roll bar in the rear. ATE disc brakes were fitted from the outset but now featuring bigger front disc brakes and calipers than the ones fitted to GT 1300 Junior cars and previous Giulia Sprint GT Veloce cars.

These changes made to the suspension and brakes resulted in improved cornering, better grip, better traction, and improved overall handling and braking.

All these changes added up to improve drive quality to maintain higher average speeds for fast touring.

Design elements of the Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GT Veloce

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GT Veloce also featured a new front fascia instead of the stepped hood of the Giulia Sprint GT, GTC, GTA, and earlier GT 1300 Junior cars. This front fascia featured incorporated four headlamps.

1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GTV
1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GTV

The chrome badge with “1750” lettering on the hood lid along with a round Alfa Romeo badge.

Quadrifoglio badges were added on the C pillars, similar to those on the Giulia Sprint GT, but the Quadrifoglio symbol was painted in gold instead of green.

For the 1971 model year, the rear light clusters were made larger in US-spec cars to comply with the new highway and safety regulations.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GT Veloce also adopted the higher rear wheel arches that were first seen on the Giulia GT 1300 Junior models.

The interior was modified a lot and now featured an all-new dashboard with a larger speedometer and a tachometer in front of the driver and these were mounted at a more conventional angle to avoid reflections caused by the upward angled flat dash of the earlier cars.

The auxiliary instruments were moved to angled bezels in the center console further from the sight of the driver than ever before for some weird reason.

The seats now featured adjustable headrests.

The window winder levers, door release levers, and the quarterlight vent knobs were also restyled.

The remote release of the boot lid was now located on the inside of the door opening on the B pillar was moved from the right-hand side of the car to the left-hand side. The location of this was independent and wasn’t affected by the car whether it is of right-hand drive configuration or left-hand drive configuration. However, since most of the cars were left-hand drive cars, it could be easily reached by the driver.

1969 Alfa Romeo 1750 GT Veloce Bertone
1969 Alfa Romeo 1750 GT Veloce Bertone

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1750 GT Veloce Series 1 could be ordered in the Bertone Luxe body which included extra options as standard.

The leather interior option allowed the customers to choose either a dark brown or red leather interior.

The seats had perforations in the leather.

The Giulia 1750 GT Veloce could be raced under the FIA homologation rules when equipped with aluminum doors and an aluminum boot lid.

The aluminum doors and aluminum boot lid were available in two ways.

The customer could purchase the Giulia 1750 GTV ad then use homologation FIA Group 2 to get aluminum doors and boot lid installed.

The second way was to get an already homologated GTAm variant.

However, in 1972 FIA rules were changes and since then the Giulia 1750 GTV cannot race with aluminum doors and boot lid in FIA events. 

The production ended in 1972. But, the production of Giulia 1750 GTV continued in South Africa until 1977. A total of 1138 South African cars were made and sold in South Africa.

The total production of the cars is approximately 32,265 including the South African cars.

1971 – 1977 Alfa Romeo Giulia 2000 GT Veloce

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 2000 GTV badge
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 2000 GTV badge

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 2000 GT Veloce was also known as the 2000 GTV. It was unveiled in 1971 along with the 2000 Berlina and 2000 Spider.

The Giulia 2000 GTV was developed to replace the Giulia 1750 GTV.

The main modification was the even larger displacement of the twin-cam inline-four engine. Now the engine displacement was 2 liters instead of the previous car’s 1.7-liter. The bore of the engine is now 84mm, the stroke is 85mm. The oil and radiator capacities were unchanged. The engine was then mated to carburetors and a five-speed manual gearbox.

Now the engine produced 130 horsepower at 5500rpm. Considering the fact that the curb weight of the car was just 1028kg, the power to weight ratio was excellent. This resulted in faster acceleration.

The US and Canadian spec cars came equipped with an Alfa Romeo’s own SPICA fuel injection system mated to the engine to improve efficiency thus increasing performance. This was due to the restrictions regarding emission controls and the use of carburetors. This setup also delivered the same official maximum power output of 130 horsepower at 5500rpm.

1972 Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV interior
1972 Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV interior

The interior trim was changed significantly.

A separate instrument cluster was introduced instead of the gauges installed in the dashboard panel.

To make the Alfa Romeo Giulia 2000 GTV look unique several design features were added.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 2000 GTV
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 2000 GTV

The grille with horizontal bars featured protruding blocks forming the familiar Alfa shield in outline.

The larger rear light clusters were the first fitter to US-spec cars to comply with new safety and highway regulations.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 2000 GTV
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 2000 GTV

The wheels featured smaller hub cups with exposed wheel nuts.

The optional aluminum alloys of the same size as the standard 5.5Jx14 steel wheels were styled to the Turbina design which was first featured on the Alfa Romeo Montreal. Turbina’s name was a reference to the design elements of the wheels resembling a jet engine inlet.

In 1972, FIA homologation rules changed so the Alfa Romeo Giulia 2000 GTV could not compete in FIA events with aluminum doors and a boot lid installed.

The last US-spec models were made in early 1975 as 1974 model year cars. The reason for this was being not able to comply with new US safety and emission regulations that were effective from 1975. To bypass this, Alfa Romeo made the early 1975 cars as 1974 model year cars despite carrying 1975 certificates of origin.

Production ended in 1976, but the production in the South African plant continued until 1977.

When production ended officially in 1976, a total of 37,459 cars were made. Another 25 cars were made in South Africa until the production ended in 1977.

1965 – 1977 Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 Junior.

1968 Alfa Romeo 1300 GT Junior
1968 Alfa Romeo 1300 GT Junior

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 Junior was unveiled in 1965 as the replacement for the Giulia Sprint 1300, which was the final iteration of the Giulietta Sprint series.

The Giulia GT 1300 Junior was fitted with a 1.3-liter twin-cam inline-four engine. This engine was similar to the engine equipped in Giulietta series cars but was revised for a 105 series with reduced port sizes and other modifications.

The reason for the introduction of a smaller displacement engine-equipped Junior variant was to attract more people who were now capable of avoiding higher taxes for higher displacement engines and some markets that kept restricting engine displacements.

The Italian market embraced the Junior well due to its ability to avoid higher taxes.

The 1.3-liter twin-cam inline-four engine delivered 89 horsepower, but the car has a total curb weight of just 930kg meant that it still offered excellent power to weight ratio thus resulted in decent acceleration.

The official 0-60mph was 12.6 seconds and the top speed was 102mph.

The first GT 1300 Junior was in production for more than a decade and received many updates from the factory. Many performance modifications were done in this time period to improve the performance alongside the higher displacement engines.

 The first Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 was based on the Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT and featured a simpler interior.

Alfa Romeo GT 1300 Junior interior
Alfa Romeo GT 1300 Junior interior

The major external styling differences were the black grille with just one horizontal chrome bar. The 9/41 final drive ratio still remained but the fifth gear ratio was now 0.85 instead of the 0.79 on all 105 series coupes.

Alongside the Giulia 1300 TI, the GT 1300 Junior pioneered the use of ATE disc brakes and it was later equipped throughout the 105 series cars replacing the Dunlop disc brakes on earlier cars.

The first Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 Junior cars lacked a brake servo and had low rear wheel arches of the Giulia Sprint GT and Giulia Sprint GTV.

From 1967 onwards, the brake servo was included as standard alongside the higher wheel arches which were also adopted on the Giulia 1750 GTV.

There were two versions of the ATE brakes.

The first version featured a setup consisting of an ATE adapter in Dunlop front uprights using the ATE caliper was also available as an option on the Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Veloce 1600.

The second version consisted of a single piece ATE uprights with no adapter plate using an ATE caliper.

For the 1968 model year, the Giulia GT 1300 Junior received many improvements along with the replacement of the Giulia Sprint GTV with the Giulia 1750GTV.

These revisions included a new reworked dashboard, reworked suspension with a new wheel size of 5.5×14 instead of 4.5×15.

The revised Giulia GT 1300 Junior still retained the step-up front body style to make it the most mechanically refined production step upfront model.

The location of the remote release for the boot lid was similar to that of the Giulia 1750 GTV. It was the only step upfront model to have the remote release on the left side b pillar.

From 1968 model year onwards, the Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 Junior cars for the US market were fitter with fuel injection system instead of carburetors to comply with new US emission regulations.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Junior
Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Junior

For the 1970 model year, the Giulia GT 1300 GT was revised again. Now it had the same front fascia as the Giulia 1750 GTV did without the step-up front. But the GT Giulia 1300 GT Junior had only two headlamps.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Junior 1
Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Junior 1

The 1972 model year received new wheels with exposed wheel nuts and smaller hubcaps similar to the ones on Giulia 2000 GTV. The new GT 1600 was unveiled alongside the revised Giulia GT 1300 Junior.

From 1972, the right-hand drive variant of the Giulia GT 1300 Junior was discontinued for the UK market but was available on all the other right-hand-drive markets.

With the change of 1972 FIA Homologation requirements, the Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 Junior could not compete in FIA events with aluminum doors and boot lid installed.

In 1974, the Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 Junior and GT 1600 Junior were rationalized into a common range with 2000 GTV. They were rebranded and remarketed as 1.3 GT Junior and 1.6 GT Junior. 

1972 – 1976 Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1600 Junior

1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1600 Junior
1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1600 Junior

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1600 Junior was unveiled in 1972 to fill the gap between the Giulia GT 1300 Junior and the high-performance Giulia 2000 GTV.

The right-hand-drive variant of the Giulia GT 1300 Junior was dropped in the UK market. But, in many markets, the Giulia GT 1300 Junior was available alongside the Giulia GT 1600 Junior and the Giulia 2000 GTV.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1600 Junior was equipped with a 1.6-liter twin-cam inline-four engine. This is the same engine that Alfa Romeo used to power the Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTV, which was discontinued back in 1968. It even featured the same engine type number as well.

The final drive ratio was now 9/41 as standard on all 105 series coupes with 1.3-liter or 1.6-liter engines. 

1974 – 1976 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1.3 GT Junior and 1974 – 1977 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1.6 GT Junior.

1975 Alfa Romeo GT 1.3 Junior
1975 Alfa Romeo GT 1.3 Junior

From the 1974 model year onwards, the Alfa Romeo Giulia GT 1300 Junior and GT 1600 Junior were rationalized into a common range of models with the Giulia 2000 GTV. Now they were rebadged and remarketed as Giulia 1.3 GT Junior, and Giulia 1.6 GT Junior.

Both Giulia 1.3 GT Junior and Giulia 1.6 GT Junior shared many interiors and exterior features with the high-performance Giulia 2000 GTV. Most of the mechanical components were also the same with the engine displacement, the smaller front brakes on junior models, different gear ratios, and fifth gear ratio being the only significant differences.

The smaller front disc brake calipers were used in the 1.3 GT Junior and 1.6 GT Junior models because they could not adopt the larger units fitted to the Giulia 1750 GTV and Giulia 2000 GTV models.

The gear ratios were different. The Giulia 1.3 GT Junior had a gear ratio of 4.55:1, Giulia 2000 GTC had a gear ratio of 4.1:1.

The fifth gear ratio of the Giulia 1.3 GT Junior was 0.85:1, and all the other 105 series cars used a fifth gear ratio of 0.79:1.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1.3 GT Junior has a tight suspension setup.

1975 Alfa Romeo GT Junior 1.3 Lusso
1975 Alfa Romeo GT Junior 1.3 Lusso

Another significant fact about Giulia 1.3 GT Junior is that the whole car weighed only 930kg. Due to this, when cornering at higher speeds, the car would go often on three wheels, lifting the inside front wheel off the road.

 Production of the Giulia 1.3 GT Junior ended in 1967 and the Giulia 1.6 GT Junior ended production in 1977.

1976 Alfa Romeo GT 1.6 Junior
1976 Alfa Romeo GT 1.6 Junior

The total number of Giulia 1.3 GT Junior cars produced was 91,964 units, making it one of the highest produced Giulia GT variants of all time.

13,120 units of the 1.6 GT Junior cars were produced as well.

1969 – 1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia Junior Z 

1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Junior Zagato
1970 Alfa Romeo Giulia GT Junior Zagato

It was unveiled at the Turin Motor Show in November 1969.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Junior Z was designed by Ercole Spada at Zagato of Milan. This car featured a more aerodynamic Kamm tail wedge-shaped bodywork.

The rear boot lid could be opened a crack to aid in-cabin ventilation, it could be operated electronically from the inside of the cabin.

It was based on the chassis, drivetrain, and suspension of the Alfa Romeo Spider 1300 Junior. The floorplan has shortened behind the rear wheels to fit the short rear overhang of the Zagato bodywork.

The engine was the same 1.3-liter twin-cam inline-four engine with two twin-choke carburetors of the GT 1300 Junior and Spider 1300 Junior.

The maximum power output of the car was rated at 88 horsepower at 6000rpm.

1972 Alfa Romeo Junior Z GT 1300 Zagato
1972 Alfa Romeo Junior Z GT 1300 Zagato

Zagato developed aluminum bodies lightweight Giulietta SZ car of the previous years was race-oriented and was very active in competition stages. The Junior Z on the other hand was not specifically developed for racing and was designed for on-road performance rather track racing. Due to this, it didn’t see much competition.

Like the previous Zagato-designed cars, the Junior Z also featured a steel bodyshell with an all-aluminum hood, door panels.

Due to the use of a shortened floor pan, aluminum boot lid, and aluminum doors, the curb weight of the car was now 920kg.

1972 Alfa Romeo Junior Z GT 1300 Zagato 1
1972 Alfa Romeo Junior Z GT 1300 Zagato 1

This means that the 88-horsepower engine was more than enough to propel the 920 kg to achieve better performance. The car was capable of achieving a 109mph top speed.

Highly bolstered bucket seats with incorporated headrests were included as standard to provide a comfortable driving experience, making it suitable to be used as a daily driven car.

The dashboard was also designed by Zagato. Now it featured all the instruments in front of the driver. The instrument cluster featured two large instruments featuring the tachometer and speedometer. In the middle of those, three small instruments showed auxiliary gauges like a fuel gauge, water temperature, and oil temperature.

The steering wheel was the same two-spoke plastic rimmed one from other Junior models.

The production of the Junior Z continued until the end of 1972 and was replaced with a more powerful 1600 Junior Z.

A total of 1117 units were built and two bodyshells were destroyed due to not meeting expected quality standards. Though production officially ended by the end of 1972, two more cars were made in 1972 to take the place of the ones that were destroyed.

1972 – 1975 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Junior Z. 

Alfa Romeo 1600 GT Junior Zagato
Alfa Romeo 1600 GT Junior Zagato

In November 1972, the 1600 Junior Z was unveiled at the Turin Motor Show.

Unlike Junior Z, the 1600 Junior Z was based on an unaltered floor pan of the 1600 Spider Junior. So, it was almost four inches longer than the Junior Z.

To accommodate this added length, the sloping roofline now ran further backward and the back panel is different and lower.

The lower part of the bumper features a bulge to make room for a spare tire.

1.6-liter twin-cam inline-four engine with two twin-choke carburetors delivered an impressive 108 horsepower at 6000rpm.

The weight of the car was 950kg. The 108-horsepower engine offered an excellent power to weight ratio, resulting in an excellent performance.

The official 0-60mph time is not known, but the car was capable of achieving a top speed of 118mph. (190 km/h)

Alfa Romeo 1600GT Junior Zagato rear
Alfa Romeo 1600GT Junior Zagato rear

The 1600 Junior Z looked unique due to the long tail, bulky arched front bumper, larger taillights from 2000 Berlina, black plastic housing in door handles, downwards exhaust pipe, fuel filler on the left side, and badges that read “1600 Z”.

Interior received a new steering wheel, which was made out of an actual wood rim with horn buttons through the three metal spokes.

A total of 402 cars were made from 1972 to 1973. The cars that were not sold in 1973 were sold until 1975 as 1974 and 1975 model year cars.  

Giulia Gran Turismo Alleggerita (GTA)

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA Scuderia
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA Scuderia

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA variants were manufactured from 1965 to 1971. These were made specifically for competing in track racing events and road performance.

At the time, Alfa Romeo was very involved in motorsport events.

The Autodelta, racing division of Alfa Romeo, developed a car for competing in track racing events, but it wasn’t much different from the road-going ones from outer looks.

Italians used Corsa (track racing) and Stradale (road use) to give the customer an idea of what they are getting and what to choose from.  These were, however, more performance packages that further optimized the cars for either track or road performance.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA

Similar to that philosophy, Autodelta decided to name their cars Alleggerita, which means lightweight in Italian.

So, Alfa Romeo decided to name these race-ready variants as GTA (Gran Turismo Alleggerita).

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA

1964 Autodelta Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 1
1964 Autodelta Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 1
1964 Autodelta Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA
1964 Autodelta Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA

The Giulia GTA was the first-ever GTA to be produced. This specific Giulia GTA was equipped with a 1.6-liter inline-four engine.

In 1965, the Alfa Romeo started the production of Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA with the 1.6-liter inline-four engine. It was soon joined by a 1.3-liter inline-four powered Giulia GTA Junior.

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 8
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 8
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 3
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 3

These Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA variants were available with either Stradale or Corsa trim.

The Giulia GTA had aluminum outer body panels instead of steel. The inner steel panels were of a thinner gauge. Inner and outer panels were bonded and pop-riveted together.

Magnesium alloy wheels, clear Plexiglas side windows, different door handles, different quarter window mechanisms, an all-aluminum rear upper control arm, and lightweight interior trim were equipped instead of the standard ones to save weight further.

To improve the performance of the engine, now it featured a double ignition cylinder head (commonly known as twin spark) with a Marelli distributor from a Ferrari Dino. A two-barrel 45mm Weber carburetors were used instead of 40mm ones. A magnesium camshaft cover, sump, timing cover, and bell housing were fitted instead of the stock ones.

The transmission unit had closer than standard gear ratios and the gears were machined for lightness and quicker shifting.

The curb weight of the car was 740kg.

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 1
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 1
Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 GTA 1
Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 GTA 1

The Stradale variant which was for on-road performance delivered 113 horsepower in comparison to the stock engines 105 horsepower. The maximum torque output was rated at 105 lb-ft at 3000rpm.

The Corsa variant, optimized for track performance, now delivered 170 horsepower.

The Giulia GTA now featured a thicker radiator than the stock and did not come with a brake booster.

Five hundred were made to comply with FIA homologation requirements. Some of these were Corsa variants and the others were Stradales.

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 2
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 2
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 3
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 3
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 4
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 4
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 5
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 5
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 6
1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 6

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 1900 and Giulia GTA 2000

1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
1972 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 1
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 1

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA  2000 was a kind of testbed for the engine for the GTAm.

The engine used to power the Giulia GTA 2000 was a 2.0-liter inline-four engine with Lucas fuel injection. This unit delivered a maximum output of 208 horsepower at 6500rpm.

The Giulia GTA 2000 was actually based on the chassis of a GTA 1300 Junior.

The magnesium wheels were now fitted with either 14×7 Michelin PA2 or TA3 tires.

The Autodelta team used multiple Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 2000 cars to compete in several motorsport events.

The first-ever International racing event where an Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 2000 competed was the 1969 Tour de Corse Rally. This rally was held on 8th and 9th November.

Pinto and Santonacci had to retire after a tire puncture. Barayller and Fayel had to retire due to a clutch failure.

However, in the hands of Tony Adriaensen, the Giulia GTA 2000 won 1st overall place in the circuit of Benguela, Angola. (10th April 1970)

Andrianensen also won 1st place in Circuit of Cabinda, Angola, in which Bandeira and Viera were runners up behind him. (26th April, 1970)

Zambello and Fernandez won 2nd place in Sao Paulo, Brazil rally in 1970.

Catapani won the overall 1st place in Interlagos event, Brazil, 1970.

Six-hour Intercacionals do Huamba even held in Nova Lisboa circuit, Angola in 1970. Fraga and Resende won 2nd place.

1968 – 1975 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 1300 Junior

Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 GTA
Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300 GTA

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA 1300 Junior was equipped with a 1.3-liter inline-four engine and shared many mechanical components with its Giulia GTA cousin.

The Giulia GTA 1300 Junior however had a shorter stroke crankshaft.

The GTA 1300 Junior Stradale variant didn’t feature many weight-saving features such as plexiglass plastic side windows, magnesium engine components, and magnesium alloy wheels to keep the cost down.

The 1.3-liter inline-four delivered 95 horsepower at first but was improved soon to deliver 110 horsepower. 

Autodelta created their own variant of the Giulia GTA 1300 Junior with fuel injection. These cars delivered 163 horsepower.

A total of 450 units were produced from 1968 to 1975.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 5
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 5
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 7
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA 7

1969 – 1971 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTAm

1968 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 1750 GTAm
1968 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint 1750 GTAm
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm

The Giulia GTAm was unveiled in 1969. The A moniker represents either Alesaggio Maggiorato or Alleggerita Modificata.

Alesaggio Maggiorato means increased bore in Italian. Alleggerita Modificata means lightened modified in Italian.

However, neither of these were officially backed up by Alfa Romeo.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia GTAm is equipped with a 2.0-liter twin-cam inline-four engine. This engine is then mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. This combination delivers 240 horsepower.

1972 Monza 4 hours Alfa Romeo Giulia 2000 GTAm
1972 Monza 4 hours Alfa Romeo Giulia 2000 GTAm

The Giulia GTA has a full steel body but some parts are modified with aluminum or fiberglass parts. It features fewer aluminum and fiberglass parts than it did before because now the minimum weight required for the 1971 season FIA homologation was 940kg instead of the previous 920kg.

The base of the GTAm range was a Giulia 1750 GTV with SPICA mechanical fuel injection system. The EU spec Giulia 1750 GTV came with dual carburetors from Del’Orto or a Weber Carburetor.

The same happened for the Giulia 2000 GTV and the Giulia 1300 GT Junior.

Some racers and tuners ordered parts from Autodelta and carried out modifications on already purchased cars.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm 2
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm 2
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm 1
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm 1

The 1.7-liter twin cam engine was used and by inserting a mono sleeve instead of for individual cylinder liners, received a displacement of 2-liters (121.1 cu). This allowed these engine-equipped cars to compete in the 2000cc class. Due to this reason, many believe that Am moniker means Alesaggio Maggiorato, increased bore in Italian.

Around 40 GTAm cars with either 2-liter twin-cam inline-four engine or a 1.7-liter modified by inserting a mono sleeve instead of individual cylinder liners to have a displacement of 2-liters. This includes the GTAm cars built by private tuners and race teams.

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm 2
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprintits 2
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm 1
Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTAm 1

GTAm program never had its own specific chassis numbers, so this number is not easy to verify. 

1967 – 1968 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 GTA SA

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA rear
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA rear
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Gran Turismo Allegerita Sovralimentato (GTA SA) was first produced in 1967. This is one of the rarest Alfa Romeo cars ever built.

The total production of this car is ten units.

This car was equipped with a 1.6-liter twin spark inline-four engine with two oil-driven superchargers. SA moniker means Sovralimento, supercharged in Italian.

This engine delivers 250 horsepower at 7500rpm when mated to a five-speed manual gearbox.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA

The Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 GTA SA was made specifically for FIA Group 5 racing events in Europe.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA

It won the overall first place in 100 miles Hockenheim endurance race in 1967 in the hands of Siegfried Dau. 

Both GTA, GTA 1300 Junior, and the GTAm were successful as race cars and won multiple racing events.

In the opening season at Monza, they won the first seven places.

Andrea de Adamich won the European Touring Car Championship in 1966 behind the wheels of a GTA in 1966.

The GTA then went on to win European Touring Car Championship in 1967 and 1968.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTAm car achieved multiple ETCC titles in 1970 and 1971.

Toine Hezemansa won the 24 hours of Francorchamps behind the wheel of 1750 GTAm and 2000 GTAm cars.

Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA
Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA SA

From 1965 to 1971, these cars won hundreds of racing events but with the dawn of 1971, the BMW cars begin to outperform the GTA variants. But, in the hands of a decent driver, a 2000 GTA could easily keep up with a 3-liter V6 powered BMW CSL.

Horst Kwech and Gaston Andrey won the under the 2-liter class of the SCCA Trans-Am championship in 1966. Horst Kwech also won the SCCA National B Sedan ARRC Championship in the same year behind the wheels of the same GTA.

GTA won the SCCA championship again in 1970.

Alfa Romeo Montreal

 
 

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