Alfa Romeo Montreal

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

The Alfa Romeo Montreal is a four-seater two-door coupe manufactured by Alfa Romeo from 1970 to 1977.

It was unveiled as a concept at the Expo 1967 event held in Montreal, Canada as a concept.

1967 Alfa Romeo Montreal Prototype
1967 Alfa Romeo Montreal Prototype

The concept cars were on display without any pre-assigned names. Eventually, the public began to call it “Montreal”.

The Montreal concept car featured a four-seat, two-door layout. It was based on the chassis of Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT.

The bodywork and the car were designed by Marcello Gandini at Bertone.

 It was powered by a 1.6-liter engine derived from Alfa Romeo Giulia TI.

Two concept cars were produced and one was put on display at Expo 1967 and the other went to the Alfa Romeo Historical Museum.

You can read more on amazing Alfa Romeo concept cars here

1970 – 1977 Alfa Romeo Montreal

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

The first production car was codenamed the Tipo 105.64. It was shown at the 1970 Geneva Motor Show. It was quite unusual from the original in terms of mechanical components.

Technical Specifications of Alfa Romeo Montreal

Alfa Romeo Montreal engine
Alfa Romeo Montreal engine

Now the car was powered with a more powerful 2.5-liter (158.2 cu) V8 engine with 90 degrees dry-sump lubrication and cross-plane crankshaft design. The bore of the engine was 80 mm and the stroke was only 64.5 mm, and a compression ratio of 9.0:1.

The engine was then incorporated with a SPICA fuel injection system.

Alfa Romeo Montreal engine TCE
Alfa Romeo Montreal engine TCE

Then the engine was mated to a more reliable five-speed manual ZF gearbox of German origin.

A limited-slip differential was added to increase the efficiency of power delivery and handling.

The power output was rated at 197 horsepower at 6500rpm and the maximum torque was 173 lb-ft of torque at 4750rpm.

This all-new 2.5-liter V8 was derived from the 2.0-liter V8 used in the Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 Stradale and Tipo 33 prototype track racing cars.

The chassis of the car and the running gear of the production Montreal were based on the much performance-oriented Giulia GTV.

Alfa Romeo Montreal engine bay with the airbox cover removed
Alfa Romeo Montreal engine bay with the airbox cover removed

It featured a double-wishbone suspension with coil springs and dampers at the front and a live axle with limited-slip differential in the rear.

The reason behind the name.

The concept car was assigned a code name that wasn’t released to the public and it was unveiled alongside some other prototypes without any officially or unofficially given names.

However, the visitors called it the Montreal,  and Alfa Romeo decided to honor their fans by officially branding and marketing it as Montreal.

1972 Alfa Romeo Montreal
1972 Alfa Romeo Montreal
1973 Alfa Romeo Montreal 1
1973 Alfa Romeo Montreal 1
1974 alfa romeo montreal
1974 alfa romeo montreal

Performance Specifications

The Alfa Romeo Montreal was capable of achieving  0-60mph in 7.4 seconds, according to the Quattroruote Magazine.

It ran the quarter-mile in 15.1 seconds.

The official top speed was 137mph, but the Quattroruote magazine recorded a top speed of 139mph.

Unique features of the Alfa Romeo Montreal

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

The unique features such as the front fascia featuring four headlamp system with unusual grilles. These retracted when the lights are switched on.

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

 A low drag air inlet NACA duct on the hood was added as a stylistic design element. However, it doesn’t draw air into the engine, with the sole purpose being hiding the power bulge ( a raised part of the hood).

Alfa Romeo Montreal C pillar
Alfa Romeo Montreal C pillar

The slats behind the doors contain cabin vents. It doesn’t have any sort of aerodynamical improvement other than serving as cabin vents. Its existence was mainly to serve a cosmetic purposes.

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

The production car’s bodywork and design were done by Marcello Gandini and the instrument cluster was designed by Paolo Martin.

The production was done in a collaboration with Alfa Romeo’s own Arese plant, and the Carrozzerria Bertone’s Caselle and Grugliasco plants outside Turin.

Alfa Romeo’s Arese plant made the chassis, drivetrain, and all the mechanical components. Then the chassis and some mechanical components were sent to Carrozzerria Bertone’s Caselle plant.

Carrozzerria Bertone’s Caselle plant then made the body of the car, attached it to the chassis. Then these units were sent to their own Grugliasco plant to be degreased, partly zinc coated, manually spray-painted, and the interior of the car was also fitted.

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

Carrozzerria Bertone then sent the car to Alfa Romeo’s Arese plant to have the engine and mechanical components such as the transmission fitted in.

Due to this production methodology, there were no matching numbers or any correspondence between chassis number, engine number, or even the production date.

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

Every car came with 195/70 VR 14-inch tires in the front and 225/50 VR 16-inch tires in the rear.

From, the start of production in 1971 to the end of production in 1976, it remained generally unchanged. Eventually, it was removed from Alfa Romeo’s model lineup in 1977.

 Total production numbers are approximately 3900 units.

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

The Alfa Romeo Montreal was more expensive than the Jaguar E Type and the much famous Porsche 911. When it was unveiled in the UK for sale, it came with a price tag of GBP 5077, eventually rising to GBP 5549 in August 1972, and a staggering GBP 6999 in mid-1976.

Despite the namesake, it wasn’t sold in America or Canada, since Alfa Romeo never developed a US-spec car to meet the emission control requirements such as the catalytic converter unit, lower fuel compression ratio, etc.

To meet US safety requirements, it was necessary to provide front bumpers and a front fascia that doesn’t deform or damage safety-related components such as headlights in an event of a crash at 5mph. This meant bigger front bumpers and other safety-related components that may further add weight to the car. The highway regulations required the car’s ride height to be increased at least an inch.

alfa romeo montreal
alfa romeo montreal

These restrictions and regulations would have resulted in an underperforming engine delivering inefficient energy to power a much heavier car with compromised handling.  Alfa Romeo decided not to make a US-spec car after realizing that it wasn’t able to provide the promised performance or ride quality due to the regulations and federal requirements.

Alfa Romeo Montreal remains one of the most beautiful cars of its day and featured unique design elements and design cues.

1972 Autodelta Montreal Group 4

alfa romeo montreal wide body
alfa romeo montreal Autodelta Group 4 wide body

Autodelta SpA, Alfa Romeo’s own competition department built a Group 4 Montreal in late 1972. It was unveiled at the London Racing Car Show in January 1973.

This car was sold to Alfa Romeo enthusiasts in the Germany Racing team to be used in Deutsche Rennsport Meisterschaft (DRM). The car was chosen for the 1973 season and the driving duties were entrusted to Dieter Gleich.

This Autodelta Montreal Group 4 car featured some slight aerodynamic improvements.

The engine was a 3-liter V8 unit with a maximum output of 370 horsepower at 9000rpm.

The car was outdated soon due to the lack of further development.

It also participated in racing events in the US but without any success.

 

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