Evolution of Porsche 911: Porsche 964 and Porsche 993

1989 – 1993 Porsche 964

Porsche 964 Carrera 4

1990 Porsche 964 Coupe
1990 Porsche 964 Coupe

In 1989, the Porsche 911 went through a major evolution with the introduction of the Porsche 964.

1987 Porsche 959

The Porsche 964 featured technologies from the 959-flagship model and is a very important car for Porsche. This was a time the world economy had a recession and the company could not rely on its traditions and brand image alone to become profitable. They needed a new horse in the stables to attract new customers, even though they already had a well-received model lineup.

The Porsche 964 project was launched as the Carrera 4. The 4 was a reference to the four-wheel-drive layout of the car.

Porsche 964 Carrera 4 front
Porsche 964 Carrera 4 front

The incorporation of the four-wheel-drive layout was a demonstration of the company’s commitment to engineering and innovations.

The aerodynamic drag coefficient was rated at 0.32 due to the aerodynamic tweaking the car received.

Porsche 964 Carrera 4
Porsche 964 Carrera 4

A rear spoiler was deployed at a higher speed to preserve the design purity of the vehicle when it was at rest.

The chassis was reworked and given coil springs to provide better handling, and improved overall ride quality.    

ABS brakes and power steering were introduced for the first time.

The engine displacement was now 3.6 liters. This 3.6-liter flat-six Boxer engine now delivered 250 horsepower.

However, not everyone was pleased with the new all-wheel-drive layout and demanded the traditional rear-wheel-drive layout. To address these concerns, a rear-wheel-drive variant of the Porsche Carrera 4 was unveiled in 1990. It was called Porsche 964 Carrera 2.

Behind the story of Porsche 964

1990 Porsche 964 Carrera 2

Porsche 964 Carrera 2 cabriolet
Porsche 964 Carrera 2 cabriolet
Porsche 964 Carrera Convertible
Porsche 964 Carrera Convertible

The Porsche 964 Carrera 2 featured its Tiptronic automatic transmission, adaptive electronic management, and full manual control, making it the first Porsche to do so.

It was also among the first cars in the world to come with dual airbags as standard from 1991. The first Porsche to feature dual airbags as standard was the 1987 Porsche 944 Turbo, the flagship model at the time.

1992 Porsche 964 Carrera RS

Porsche 964 RS America
Porsche 964 RS America

For the 1992 model year, Porsche re-introduced a limited-edition Carrera RS model. This variant was inspired by the 1973 Porsche Carrera RS. This car was also legal in the European market and other markets except for the US as it didn’t comply with US emission regulations.

However, Porsche decided to develop a US-spec Porsche 964 Carrera RS to address the appeals and requests from the US customers. A limited run of 701 US-spec Porsche Carrera RS cars were made.

For the 1994 model year, the Porsche 911 Carrera RS US-spec cars came with rear seats. Only 84 US-spec cars were made in 1994.

The EU spec car was a homologation special, while the US-spec car was just a regular Carrera with some options and featured removed.

Porsche 964 Carrera RS 3.8
Porsche 964 Carrera RS 3.8

Porsche Carrera RS 3.8 of 1993 had wider Turbo-style bodywork and featured a larger fixed whale tail spoiler instead of the electronically operated rear spoiler.

The Carrera RS 3.8 was equipped with a 3.7-liter flat-six engine.

Porsche 964 RS engine
Porsche 964 RS engine

The Carrera RS US-spec model was supposed to be a no-compromise high-performance variant of the Porsche 964. It came with several factory options such as the limited-slip differential, cassette stereo, air conditioning, and a sunroof.

The interior was stripped and basic compared to the standard 911. Even the doors lacked the armrest and door pockets and have a simple pull strap for the opening mechanism.

1990 – 1994 Porsche 964 Turbo

Porsche 964 Turbo
Porsche 964 Turbo

In 1990 Porsche introduced a Turbo-charged version of the Porsche 964.

It was equipped with a 3.3 liter flat-six engine from a Porsche 930 and it was turbocharged. The power output was rated at 320 horsepower at 5750rpm.

A total of 3660 Porsche 964 Turbo cars were built.

Porsche 964 Turbo
Porsche 964 Turbo

In 1992, the 3.3-liter 964 Turbo S was introduced. This variant was also equipped with the same powertrain as the 964 Turbo, but several modifications such as bigger injectors and more boost resulted in maximum power output of 376 horsepower.

The interior was stripped and most of the creature comforts were removed to reduce weight.

Porsche 964 Turbo S was one of the fastest cars of its time.

The suspension was lowered, a front strut brace and manual steering were also included to improve handling and cornering.

Only 86 cars were made.

PORSCHE 911 964 TURBO S
PORSCHE 911 964 TURBO S

In 1993, Porsche unveiled the Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6. The engine was modified to improve engine capacity up to 3.6-liter. Now this engine delivered 360 horsepower at 5500rpm and 384 lb-ft of torque at 4200rpm.

Less than 1500 were made.

In 1994, Porsche replaced the 3.3-liter flat-six from the Porsche 930 with a 3.6-liter flat-six from a Carrera 4. The turbocharged 3.6-liter engine delivered 355 horsepower.

This car was known as the Porsche 965 after mistaking this for a stillborn project to make a cutting-edge top-of-the-line turbocharged car to replace the Porsche 959. 

Porsche 964 Turbo was well received but was phased out in 1994 in favor of the upcoming Porsche 993.

1994 Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau

Porsche 964 Turbo S slantnose US
Porsche 964 Turbo S slantnose US variant

When the production of the 1994 model year, the Porsche factory had approximately 90 Turbo chassis at their disposal. These were then transferred to the Porsche Special Order program to be built as the Porsche Turbo 3.6 S.

Porsche Turbo 3.6 S was either available with the standard Turbo body or with the slant nose option. Slantnose was known as the Flachbau.

The Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau was a $60,000 extra option on top of the base price of the $99,000 Turbo 3.6.

The US-spec Flachbau featured a front fascia similar to Porsche 993.

Porsche 964 Turbo S slantnose Japanese
Porsche 964 Turbo S slantnose Japanese

The Japanese spec flachbau mimicked the styling of the Porsche 968 front fascia.

Only 76 were made with the Flachbau option. 

1990 -1993 Porsche 964 Cup

Porsche 911 964 Cup
Porsche 911 964 Cup

The Porsche 964 Cup was based on the body shell of a Porsche 964. This was developed as the track racing version of the Porsche 964.

The 3.6-liter straight-six boxer unit delivered 265 horsepower at 6100rpm and maximum torque of 229 lb-ft at 4800rpm.

Porsche 964 Cup featured a factory-fitted roll cage.

A modified chassis set up along with 55mm lowered suspension was included to improve handling.

The interior was spartan and the soundproofing material was removed to reduce weight.

Porsche 911 964 Cup
Porsche 911 964 Cup

The gear ratios were changed to improve acceleration and the steering was a nonpower unit.

A catalytic converter and an anti-lock braking system were also included as standard.

The total curb weight was 1120kg. 

1992 Porsche Carrera Cup
1992 Porsche Carrera Cup

In 1992, the Porsche 964 was revised. Now it was based on the body shells of the Porsche 964 RS.

The engine was now delivering 275 horsepower at 6100rpm and 232 lb-ft of torque at 4800rpm.

18-inch magnesium rims were included instead f the aluminum rims to reduce weight. The suspension was lowered by a further 20mm.

ABS now could be switched off in an event of emergency braking or when reversing.

Overall curb weight was still 1120kg.

1993 30th Anniversary C4

Porsche 911 30th anniversary model
Porsche 911 30th-anniversary model

Porsche unveiled the 30th Anniversary C4 to celebrate 30 years since the launch of the original Porsche 911 in 1963.

This special variant featured a wider turbo body and four-wheel-drive system, and a small lifting wing as standard.

Despite featuring the turbo-style body, the engine was still a naturally aspirated engine.  

1993 Turbo S LM GT

1990 Porsche 964 Cup
1990 Porsche 964 Turbo S LM GT

In 1993, Porsche developed the Porsche 964 Turbo S prototype to compete in motorsport events. This car was known as the Porsche 964 Turbo S Le Mans GT.

It was based on the Porsche 964 Turbo S but featured a stripped-down interior and many factory modifications such as a roll cage to comply with FIA racing standards.

The front fascia featured a deep chin spoiler to improve aerodynamic drag. Two air inlets were also added on top of the rear wheel arches.

An adjustable racing rear wing was installed on top of the standard Turbo rear wing.

Wider wheel arches were added to comply with 12-inch-wide racing tires.

To reduce weight the windows were replaced with plastic panels. 

Porsche 911 964 Turbo LM GT
Porsche 911 964 Turbo S LM GT

The engine was a smaller twin-turbocharged 3.2-liter unit instead of the stock 3.6-liter unit.  The maximum power output was rated at 475 horsepower.

Porsche 964 Turbo S LM GT was unveiled at the 1993 12 hours of Sebring where it achieved first place in its class and overall, seventh place.

It also competed in the 24 Hours of Le Mans but failed to finish due to an engine failure.

In 1994, Porsche 964 Turbo S LM GT was then used to compete in Larbre Competition. Now it was equipped with the 3.6-liter unit derived from the 993 instead of the twin-turbocharged 3.2-liter unit.

It won second place in 24 Hours of Daytona.

Many of the technologies behind this project were later transferred to develop the Porsche 993 GT2.

1994 – 1996 Porsche 964 Speedster

Porsche 964 Speedster
Porsche 964 Speedster
Porsche 964 Speedster rear
Porsche 964 Speedster rear

The 1994 Porsche 964 Speedster was based on the Porsche 964 Carrera 2 and featured the turbo-style wide body.

It was available in either standard or lightweight trim.

It featured softer suspension when compared to the Porsche 964 RS, yet offered next to nothing creature comforts. However, power windows were included as standard alongside optional stereo and air conditioning.

Porsche planned to build 3000 Speedster units but produced only 936 during the two-year production run.

1994 – 1998 Porsche 993

Porsche 993 911
Porsche 993 911
Porsche 993 riviera blue
Porsche 993 riviera blue

The Porsche 911 was revised for the 1994 model year. This car was significant as it was the final incarnation of the air-cooled 991 which was first introduced in 1964.

Many automotive experts believe that Porsche 993 is the best of the air-cooled 911 series.

Porsche wanted the 993 series to be significantly advanced in technical and visual perspectives. Porsche wanted every part of the car to be designed from scratch, including the engine. This resulted in carrying over 20% of its parts from the previous generations.

 The Porsche 993 series was described by the Car and Driver magazine as “the ideal blend of technology and classic 911 air-cooled heritage”.

Porsche Panamericana and Porsche 993

 The exterior of the car featured an all-new front fascia with a sleek design and an all-new rear end. The revised bodywork was smoother and more aerodynamic than ever before. In many ways, it was influenced by the Porsche 959. The revised exterior panels and more flared wheel arches, an enlarged retractable rear wing, and teardrop mirrors made the car stand out from its predecessor.

Porsche 993 front
Porsche 993 front

Styling of the car was done by the British car designer and engineer, Tony Hatter under the supervision of design chief Harm Lagaay. It was completed in 1991.

Porsche engineers developed a new light-alloy subframe with coil and wishbone suspension.  The rear suspension was now an all-new multilink system, derived from the Porsche 989 project, a four-door sedan that never went into production. It was required widening of the rear wheel arches to accommodate this setup, which in turn made it more direct and stable.

Porsche 993 side
Porsche 993 side

 This setup dramatically improved the car’s handling, stability, and overall ride quality. This setup also rectified the lift-off oversteer tendencies if the brakes or throttle were applied when cornering, a problem with earlier models.

The new suspension system, along with chassis refinements, enabled the car to handle well enough to keep up dynamically with the competition. It also reduced interior noise and improved ride quality.

A revised power steering system and larger brakes with drilled discs also improved the handling, cornering further.

This made the car more civilized and improved the overall driving experience.

The engine displacement remained the same at 3.6 liters but a new dual-flow exhaust design and better engine management, resulting in a maximum power output of 268 horsepower. The power output further increased up to 282 horsepower on 1996 models.

Porsche 993 Engine
Porsche 993 Engine

Porsche 993 was also the first Porsche 911 variant to receive a six-speed transmission as standard. All its predecessors had four or five-speed transmissions.

In every virtual situation, it was possible to keep the engine at its best torque range of above 4500rpm.  

The Porsche 993 Carrera, Carrera S, Cabriolet, and Targa rear-wheel-drive variants were available with Tiptronic four-speed automatic transmission.

From 1995 model year, Porsche offered the Tiptronic S with additional steering wheel-mounted controls and refined software for smoother and quicker shifts.

The Tiptronic transmission was first introduced in the Porsche 964. However, the Tiptronic unit in the Porsche 993 was an updated variant and was capable of recognizing climbs and descents.

It is noteworthy to point out that the Tiptronic-equipped cars underperformed in comparison to a manual transmission, in terms of acceleration and top speed. But the difference was insignificant.

The Tiptronic transmission system, despite its advantages, also added 55kg to the total curb weight. 

Porsche 993 also became the first Porsche to come with variable-length intake runners with the Varioram system for the 1996 model year. This system improved the inherent compromise between the high rpm power production and lower rpm torque production.

Varioram produced additional power, particularly in mid-rpm ranges. This also resulted in more throttle noise at higher revs and as a consequence, resulted in an increase of 15% power over its predecessor featuring the same engine.

Porsche 993 was among the very first production vehicles to come equipped with this setup.

Varioram system with OBD II had issues with carbon deposits. This resulted in failed smog tests and expensive repairs. OBD 1 had lesser issues but delivered 12 horsepower less.

Porsche 993 rear
Porsche 993 rear

A new four-wheel-drive system was introduced as an option for the Porsche 993.

This system was refined over that of the Porsche 964. Porsche also departed with the Porsche 964 all-wheel-drive setup consisting of three differentials and revised the system to be based on the layout from its Porsche 959’s all-wheel-drive setup. This revision included noticeable changes such as the viscous coupling unit instead of the center differential.

This setup improved the handling characteristics in inclement weather and was able to retain the stability offered by all-wheel drive without having to suffer as many compromises as the previous all-wheel-drive system. 

Another advantage of the all-wheel-drive setup was the reduced weight due to the simpler layout.

1994 – 1998 Porsche 993 Carrera

1997 Porsche 993 Carrera S
1997 Porsche 993 Carrera S

The Porsche Carrera was available with either an all-wheel drive or rear-wheel-drive layout. It was available in coupe and cabriolet body styles.

Carrera was powered with a naturally aspirated 3.6-liter Porsche M64 single overhead cam flat-six engine. This engine was combined with a new dual-flow exhaust system and two catalytic converters.

Porsche Carrera originally was equipped with orange turn indicators on the front, side, and rear. The brake calipers were painted in black, and the black Carrera logo on the rear and 16-inch alloy wheels with black Porsche logos on the center wheel cap.

Porsche 993 Carrera S
Porsche 993 Carrera S

The 1994 model came with a ground clearance of 110mm, except for the US-spec car which had a ground clearance of 120mm. This 110mm ground clearance of the standard car was further lowered to 90mm with the M030 sport chassis option.

The Carrera coupe featured stiff suspension, tight handling, and it was also the most solid yet lightest of the 993 variants.

The Porsche 993 Carrera cabriolet was unveiled alongside the coupe in April 1994 for the 1995 model year.

1997 Porsche 993 cabriolet
1997 Porsche 993 cabriolet
1997 Porsche 993 cabriolet
1997 Porsche 993 cabriolet

The Porsche 993 Carrera cabriolet featured a fully electrical and hand-stitched soft top reinforced with metal sheets. It also featured a clever automatic wind blocker.

A small spoiler was mounted with the third braking light on the rear.

The 993 Carrera Cabriolet was a little heavier than the coupe with a curb weight of 1420kg.

1997 Porsche 993 cabriolet
1997 Porsche 993 cabriolet

Both the Carrera coupe and cabriolets were available with all-wheel drive.

The all-wheel-drive variant of the Porsche Carrera was called the Carrera 4. The rear-wheel-drive standard car was just known as the Carrera unlike the Porsche 964 which used Carrera 2 designation, a reference to the rear-wheel-drive layout.

The Porsche enthusiasts were still referring to the rear-wheel-drive variant as the Carrera 2 or C2 and the all-wheel-drive variant was known among them as C4. 

Porsche 993 Carrera 4 Cabriolet
Porsche 993 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

The Porsche 993 Carrera 4 has an automatic braking differential (ABS). It breaks the inner wheel when accelerating out of a corner.

On the exterior, the Carrera 4 is mainly identifiable due to the sliver brake calipers, silver Carrera 4 badge on the engine cover, center wheel caps with the Carrera 4 logo instead of the Porsche crest, clear front, and side indicators, and rear red turn indicators.

The revised all-wheel-drive system was lighter than the Porsche 964’s all-wheel-drive system due to the simple layout. A lower maintenance viscous coupling unit that transfers 50% of the power to the front wheels and changes the driving behavior of the car when compared to the standard Carrera.

The Porsche 993 Carrera 4’s all-wheel-drive system was more suitable to cope with slippery surfaces due to environmental conditions. It was also capable of providing better traction and stability on loose surfaces. This provides extra security in case of rain or snow. The all-wheel-drive variant was better suited for rallying due to the stability and handling improvements it provided on loose surfaces.

When competing in track events or on a dry circuit, the rear-wheel-drive variant was the fastest out of the two. The reason for this was the additional weight due to the all-wheel-drive layout.

The Tiptronic gearbox wasn’t available for the Carrera 4.

There were many extra paid performances, handling, styling options available for the Porsche 993 Carrera.

There were five different alloy wheel styles, various suspension setups, three different seat styles, various sound systems, and many upholstery options to choose from.

Porsche 993 Carrera 4S
Porsche 993 Carrera 4S

The Exclusive Program allowed the customers to customize their Porsche 993 Carrera according to their wishes. Any color was available as an option, including brightly colored interior upholstery, etc.  Porsche even offered to include a built-in telephone with fax facilities targeting the businessman.

The production ended officially in 1997, but a limited production run happened in 1998 to address special requests.

Porsche never offered a cabriolet version of the 993 Carrera, but five were made through the Porsche Exclusive department in 1997 as 1998 model cars.

1995 – 1996 Porsche 993 Carrera RS

Porsche 993 Carrera RS
Porsche 993 Carrera RS

The Porsche 993 Carrera RS is a lightweight variant of the Carrera.

It is equipped with a 3.8-liter flat-six engine. The maximum power output was rated at 296 horsepower. The extra power was achieved with the use of lightweight forged pistons, dual oil coolers, Varioram variable-length intake manifold, big intake valves, lighter rocker arms, and a modified Bosch Motronic engine management system.

The six-speed G50/31 manual gearbox with a short shifter and modified gear ratios for the first three gears was offered as standard.

To cope with the extra torque and power output of the engine, bigger brakes for the front and aft with four-piston calipers were added.

A limited slip differential was also included as the standard.

Porsche 993 RS rear
Porsche 993 RS rear

A larger fixed rear wing, three-piece aluminum alloy wheels, small front flaps, deleted headlight washers made the car stand out from the normal Carrera.

The exterior modifications included the removal of rear seats, and special racing seats with spartan door cards were installed instead of the stock interior.

The body shell was seam welded, and the hood lid was an aluminum one supported by a single strut, thinner gauge glass was used, soundproofing was reduced as much as they could, to save weight.

Porsche 993 RS
Porsche 993 RS

The suspension was improved with Bilstein dampers.

The suspension was lowered, adjustable rear and front anti-roll bars were added, an under-hood strut brace further improved handling of the car.

Porsche 993 RS side
Porsche 993 RS side

The total curb weight of the car was 1280kg. 

A special variant of the Porsche 993 Carrera RS was unveiled. It was called the Carrera RS Clubsport. This was a track-ready road-legal variant of the Porsche 993 Carrera.

Porsche 993 RS Clubsport
Porsche 993 RS Clubsport
Porsche 993 RS Clubsport
Porsche 993 RS Clubsport

Though road legal, it wasn’t of much use on road due to the race-tuned suspension and lack of creature comforts such as power windows, air conditioning, and radio. It also came with a welded roll cage as standard.

Porsche 993 Carrera RS Clubsport featured a larger rear wing and a deeper chin spoiler to improve aero drag.

The Porsche 993 Carrera RS and Carrera RS Clubsport were road legal in Europe and in many other countries excluding the US. It wasn’t allowed to be imported to the US for failing to comply with highway safety regulations.

A total of 1014 Porsche 993 Carrera cars were made including the 213 Clubsport variant, from 1995 to 1996.

1996 – 1998 Porsche 993 Targa

Porsche 911 Targa
Porsche 911 Targa

The Targa version of the Porsche 993 was introduced in the 1996 and featured the “greenhouse system” for the first time. The greenhouse system is a retractable glass roof. This was well received by the enthusiasts and continued on the 996 and 997 Targa versions.

The glass roof would retract underneath the rear window revealing a large opening.

1996 Porsche 993 Targa green house
1996 Porsche 993 Targa greenhouse

This system was a complete redesign as the previous Targa models came with a removable roof section and a wide B pillar functioning as a roll bar.

The new glass roof design allowed the Porsche 993 Targa to retain the same side-on profile as the other Porsche 911 Carrera variants while allowing the open-top experience without the inconvenience of storing the removed top of the old system.

1996 Porsche 993 Targa
1996 Porsche 993 Targa

The Targa version was based on the Porsche 993 Carrera cabriolet with the glass roof replacing the fabric roof.

Another unique feature was that the Targa version was equipped with distinctive 17-inch wheels, which was available as an option on all cars without 18-inch standard wheels.

The Targa version was well-received among the Porsche enthusiasts, but it was plagued with many problems. An excessive heat generation in the cabin, over-complicated and not reliable roof mechanism, creaking noises on rough noises due to the lower structural rigidity, higher center of gravity due to the heavier Targa roof and its folding mechanism on top of the car were the main problems.

Due to these problems, the demand for the Targa decreased gradually over its limited production life span.

A total of 2442 Targa cars were made in 1996, followed by 1843 in 1997, and 334 for the 1998 model year. The total production is 4619 cars.

1995 – 1998 Porsche 993 Turbo

Porsche 993 Turbo
Porsche 993 Turbo

The Porsche 933 Turbo coupe was unveiled in 1995 and was available for the 1996 model year.

It was equipped with the same 3.6-liter flat-six as before, but now it was attached to a new twin-turbocharging system. To reduce the excess heat generated due to the turbocharging, an air-to-air intercooler system was added. Electronic engine management, redesigned cylinder heads to cope with more stress and heat, modified engine internals completed the new powertrain design. This system delivered an astonishing 402 horsepower maximum output.

Porsche 993 Turbo
Porsche 993 Turbo

The Porsche 993 Turbo was the first 911 Turbo with an all-wheel-drive layout. The all-wheel-drive derived from the Porsche 959.

The bodywork of the car differs from the Carreras due to the widened wheel arches, a fixed whale tail rear wing housing the intercoolers, redesigned front and rear bumper moldings, all-new 18-inch alloy wheels with hollow spokes as standard.

Porsche 993 Turbo front
Porsche 993 Turbo front
Porsche 993 Turbo rear
Porsche 993 Turbo rear

Porsche 993 Turbo was among the first production cars to have an OBD II diagnostic system. OBD means On-Board Diagnostic system. The 3.8-liter and GT versions of the Porsche 993 didn’t have the OBD II system. The normally aspirated Porsche 993 variants got the ODB in 1996.

Porsche 993 Turbo is the only generation to feature an air-to-air intercooler system.

The successors of the Porsche 993 Turbo featured water-cooled heads.

Porsche 993 Turbo
Porsche 993 Turbo

To cope with added power output and excess torque, bigger brake calipers were added and these were bigger than the ones on the base Carrera model.

The 1997 and 1998 model year Porsche 933 Turbo had some significant differences in comparison to the 1996 cars.

The 1997 and 1998 cars had stronger transmission input shafts to cope with excess power generation and all-wheel-drive system, an ECU that was modifiable, standard wheel center caps had turbo logo embedded on them, motion sensors were integrated into the map light above the rear-view mirror, adding a child seat on top of the passenger seat disabled the airbag of the passenger side.

1996 Porsche 993 RSR

Porsche 993 RSR
Porsche 993 RSR

In the late 1990s, there was a big demand for GT racing, both in Europe and in America.
The Porsche 993 RSR was developed to compete in 24-hour endurance events such as the Daytona, and Le Mans.

Porsche 993 RSR
Porsche 993 RSR


Porsche 993 RSR cars were based on the 993 Carrera 2 coupes. The naturally aspirated boxer unit was capable of delivering 310 horsepower or 40 more horsepower than the previous Carrera 2. The stock boxer unit was limited to 6,900 revolutions, but the RSR engine could rev even higher to deliver maximum power in between 325 and 350 horsepower. The six-speed transmission transferred the power to the rear wheels.

1997 Porsche 993 RSR 911 factory racecar
1997 Porsche 993 RSR 911 factory racecar


Standard factory fitted equipment on the Porsche 993 RSR included a fully-welded roll cage, lightweight alloy hood, front strut brace, fully ball-jointed suspension, two-way adjustable Bilstein suspension, a single racing seat and harness, battery switch, and a fire extinguishing system

1997 Porsche 993 RSR 911 factory racecar
1997 Porsche 993 RSR 911 factory racecar


Porsche 993 RSR featured bolt-on fender flares, a special front spoiler, and an adjustable gigantic rear wing to improve downforce.
To keep the weight down, a stripped-out interior was the standard.

Porsche 993 RSR interior
Porsche 993 RSR interior


Porsche officially produced only 20 RSR engine units for the 1996 season, but many third parties did conversions using Porsche parts. The number of unofficial conversions is not known.
Only thirty Porsche 993 3.8 RSR cars were produced for the 1997 season.
Porsche 993 3.8 RSR is widely considered as the last of the breed of air-cooled, naturally-aspirated 911s to come from the Weissach before the introduction of Type 996 water-cooled cars.
Porsche 993 3.8 RSR participated in many tough endurance races in the 1996 and 1997 seasons. Due to this, only a few exist in original condition.

1997 – 1998 Porsche 993 Turbo S

Porsche 993 Turbo S
Porsche 993 Turbo S

Porsche unveiled a new Porsche 993 Turbo S variant for the 1997 model year. This was available as an exclusive option. The Turbo S featured a high spec larger KKK K24 turbochargers, an additional oil cooler, and a modified Motronic engine management system. It delivered 450 horsepower maximum.

The interior had carbon fiber touches to further reduce the weight. The door sills were also carbon fiber and featured Turbo S badges and air scoops behind the doors.

PORSCHE 911 993 TURBO S
PORSCHE 911 993 TURBO S

It also featured a quad pipe exhaust system, a slightly larger rear wing, yellow brake calipers, a front lip spoiler with brake cooling ducts for EU spec cars.

 Porsche 993 Turbo S was the last of the air-cooled 911 Turbo cars and the total curb weight was 1500kg.

Porsche 993 turbo S
Porsche 993 turbo S

The 0-60mph was achieved in 3.6 seconds, 0-100mph in 8.9 seconds, the top speed was an impressive 184.3mph.

Porsche 933 Turbo S was among the fastest production cars of its time.

Only 183 cars were ever made.

1996 Porsche 911 GT1

1996 Porsche 911 GT1
1996 Porsche 911 GT1

Porsche 911 (Type 993) GT1 was unveiled in 1996. Rather than developing a track variant of one of their production models, they created a truly purpose-built sports-oriented prototype.

In order to comply with regulations, a street-legal version was developed called the 911 GT1 Stra├čenversion.

Though it shared the 911 moniker, the car actually had very little in common with the Porsche 993. It shared only the front and rear headlamps with the production Porsche 993.

When it comes to mechanical components, the frontal chassis was derived from the Porsche 993, while the rear of the chassis was derived from the Porsche 962 along with its engine.

1996 Porsche 911 GT1 engine
1996 Porsche 911 GT1 engine
1996 Porsche 911 GT1 engine
1996 Porsche 911 GT1 engine
1996 993 GT1 engine hoses, cables, wires, connectors
1996 993 GT1 engine hoses, cables, wires, connectors

The water-cooled, twin-turbocharged and intercooled, 4 valves per cylinder 3.2-liter flat-six engine was mated with a Bosch Motronic 5.2 fuel injection.

This engine was then longitudinally-mounted in a rear mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout, compared to the rear-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout of the Porsche 993.

This engine delivered a maximum power output of 592 hp.

1996 Porsche 911 GT1 front
1996 Porsche 911 GT1 front

In comparison, the Type 993 Porsche 911 GT2, the company’s highest-performance vehicle at the time, used an air-cooled engine with only two valves per cylinder.

The Porsche 911 GT1 made its debut in the BPR Global GT Series at the Brands Hatch 4 hours.

The 1996 911 GT1 achieved a top speed of exactly 330 km/h (205 mph) on the Mulsanne Straight in the practice sessions of the 1996 Le Mans 24 Hours Race.

The 1996 – 1998 Porsche 993 GT2

Porsche 993 GT2
Porsche 993 GT2

The Porsche 993 GT2 was the racing variant of the Porsche 933 Turbo. This was specifically made to compete in FIA GT2 class racing.

In the mid-1990s, the FIA and many other sanctioning bodies of road racing had placed bans and limitations to prohibit all-wheel-drive systems. This was largely due to the dominance of Audi Quattro, Lancia Delta S4 Integrale in rally events, and in other touring car racing events around the globe in the 1970s and 1980s. The Nissan Skyline, Porsche 959, Porsche 961 was also dominating the racing events in the 1990s.

Porsche 993 GT2 & Mazda RX-8
Porsche 993 GT2 & Mazda RX-8

Many argued that the all-wheel-drive layout was an injustice to the talented drivers who were competing in rear-wheel-drive cars.

The Porsche 993 GT2 was based on the Porsche 993 Turbo and were rear-wheel drive only. The deletion of all-wheel-drive system provided some advantages such as weight saving of at least 50kg for the competition car.

To comply with FIA homologation requirements, several GT2 cars were produced and sold to the public. These were street legal.

The Porsche 993 GT2 is the rarest of all 993 series cars. It is highly valued by collectors. The interior of the Porsche 993 GT2 was similar to that of the Carrera RS, featuring carbon-fiber trim to save weight.

1996 Porsche 911 993 GT2
1996 Porsche 911 993 GT2
1996 Porsche 911 993 GT2 interior
1996 Porsche 911 993 GT2 interior
Porsche 993 GT2
Porsche 993 GT2

The fenders of the Porsche 993 Turbo were cut back and were replaced with bolt on plastic pieces to accommodate larger racing tires and to ease the repairs of the damage to the fenders that are an often occurrence in motorsport racing.

Porsche 993 GT2 rear
Porsche 993 GT2 rear

Until 1997, the street-legal version of the Porsche 993 GT2 came equipped with the same engine as the Porsche 993 Turbo. But it was tuned to operate with higher boost pressure to deliver a maximum power output of 424 horsepower.

For 1998 model year, a twin ignition system was added. This resulted in a power increase of 444 horsepower at 6000rpm and 432 torque at 3500rpm.

From 1996 to 1998, only 52 road-legal Porsche 993 GT2 cars were made.

Porsche 993 GT2
Porsche 993 GT2
Porsche 993 GT2 rear
Porsche 993 GT2 rear

The racing variants had a different engine setup depending on the applicable racing series.

For the 1996 model year, the Porsche 993 GT2 racing variant came with 450 horsepower at 5700rpm and a maximum torque of 494 lb-ft at 5000rpm.

A special Evo variant was developed to compete in the GT 1 series, packing 592 horsepower. Only 11 Evo cars were made. This was eventually succeeded by the mid-engine 911 GT1

1998 Porsche 993 GT2 Evo
1998 Porsche 993 GT2 Evo

1995 – 1998 Porsche 993 Speedster

Porsche 993 Speedster was a variant of the 993 with a lowered roofline and a redesigned interior.

This was a reference to the G series and Porsche 964 Speedster.

The Porsche 993 Speedster wasn’t offered officially, but two were made.

A British racing green color Speedster with Tiptronic S transmission and 17-inch alloy wheels was made for Ferdinand Alexander Porsche for his 60th birthday in 1995.

1995 Porsche 993 Speedster
1995 Porsche 993 Speedster
1998 Porsche 993 Speedster S
1998 Porsche 993 Speedster S

Another one was made for Jerry Seinfeld in 1998. This car featured a wide-body turbo look and was painted in Silver. This car featured manual transmission and 18-inch alloy wheels.  This was derived from a cabriolet model and was sent back to the factory to be rebuilt through the Exclusive department.

A total of 993 convertibles were converted to the Speedster body style by an aftermarket coach builder.

Porsche 993 Turbo Cabriolet

Porsche 911 turbo cabriolet
Porsche 911 turbo cabriolet
Porsche 993 turbo cabriolet rear
Porsche 993 turbo cabriolet rear

Porsche offered a cabriolet variant of the Porsche 993 for the 1995 model year. A total of 14 cars were sold before the introduction of the Porsche 993 Turbo coupe.

The Porsche 993 Turbo Cabriolet came equipped with a single turbocharged engine from a Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6. This engine was then mated with a five-speed manual transmission. These cars were rear-wheel-drive only and featured the rear wing of the Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6. This was very expensive. 

Evolution of Porsche 911: Porsche 996

 
 

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